Enterprise Case Study: Democratizing Insights in the NHS

Enterprise Case Study: Democratizing Insights in the NHS ? Striking a balance between customization and standardization is difficult in analytics. RAIDR"s function is to support commissioning and services within the NHS framework. As its remit expands and develops to include more unstructured data, investment in big data technology and support of a more discovery-based approach to analytics will become more important. Recommendations for the healthcare industry Recommendations for healthcare enterprises Strong user involvement from a cross section of users is critical, from design to implementation The NECS team involved users heavily from the start of RAIDR"s design through to...
Enterprise Case Study: Democratizing Insights in the NHS ? Striking a balance between customization and standardization is difficult in analytics. RAIDR"s function is to support commissioning and services within the NHS framework. As its remit expands and develops to include more unstructured data, investment in big data technology and support of a more discovery-based approach to analytics will become more important. Recommendations for the healthcare industry Recommendations for healthcare enterprises Strong user involvement from a cross section of users is critical, from design to implementation The NECS team involved users heavily from the start of RAIDR"s design through to implementation, and actively supports training and user education. It is yet another example of how fundamental user involvement is, especially in the domain of self-service analytics. Be prepared to tackle the data and performance skeletons that will be uncovered by analytics at scale RAIDR"s aggregation of multiple sources of data has uncovered significant data anomalies and mistakes. This is a critically valuable offshoot of analytics programs at scale, but it can result in uncomfortable findings. Executive support and workforce engagement are important in ensuring these findings are acted upon. Land and expand: A clear strategy with realistic expectations will take you far RAIDR had a clear remit: to democratize and improve analytics to improve health services, reduce costs, and remove data silos. However, it started off modestly, with a more limited number of dashboards, and was initially rolled out within NEC"s home patch. In a complex environment with a lot of different stakeholders with varied needs, this is a far more sensible approach than implementing a large, top-down analytics program. RAIDR: A common intelligence platform for NHS organizations Healthcare context Business intelligence is not traditionally a strong point of the NHS The NHS has a strong culture of medical research and collaborative work, but the use of business intelligence (BI) and analytics at the clinical, operational, and planning levels is relatively underdeveloped and fragmented. This fragmentation is partly related to the structural divisions between acute, primary, and social care in England and Wales. On a macro level, the NHS has suffered from the usual "silo" development of BI, with different data sets, tools, and approaches to gathering and using business intelligence. The latest healthcare reforms, including both the 2012 Health and Social Care Act and the Five Year Forward View, place strong emphasis on integrated care, with clinical commissioning groups playing a key role in planning and managing care across the spectrum. Although the creation of RAIDR © Ovum. All rights reserved. Unauthorized reproduction prohibited. Page 3 Enterprise Case Study: Democratizing Insights in the NHS superseded the current healthcare reforms, its aims and design support a much more integrated and refined approach to planning and designing healthcare to meet the needs of local populations. Typical usage cases also highlight the role of tools such as RAIDR in helping drive and inform a culture of optimization and planning based on outcomes, as opposed to blunt cost-cutting, for example via staff reduction or cuts to social care funding. Examples range from RAIDR"s use for identifying avoidable emergency readmissions to its role in targeting high-cost patients who require more substantial and coordinated primary and social care. Commissioning support units are idiosyncratic to the NHS NECS is one of six CSUs in England. CSUs offer support services to NHS organizations – primarily clinical commissioning groups (CCGs), GP practices, foundation trusts, NHS England, and local authorities. These range from business support functions in HR and finance to supporting organizational transformation – for example, consultancy and service redesign with strong ICT support. CSUs have an interesting history. They were created two years ago as part of the health and social care reforms in England. Many of the more "bread and butter" services they provide today were delivered by the now-defunct primary care trusts (PCTs). Originally, 23 were set up, but most failed to develop as sustainable businesses; many argued there were too many. Although they are NHS organizations, they must operate on a commercial footing and be income self-sufficient. Today there are only six CSUs on the Lead Provider Framework, a new procurement mechanism for CCGs and other commissioners. They compete directly with Capita, Optum, and the eMBED Health consortium, which are the only commercial suppliers on the framework. CSUs compete with each other, but they also have a history of cooperation. In 2014, five CSUs formed the Elis Group strategic alliance to share best practice across the commissioning support sector. The other goal – to raise the status of the commissioning support profession – is aimed at ensuring CSUs can compete with other commercial organizations delivering support services. Strong CSUs will play a more important role in the shift to integrated care NECS is one of the larger and most successful CSUs, with revenues of £66m in 2014/15 and around 900 staff working across the North East. Most of its customers are in this region, but it also sells services to organizations in the rest of England. As CCGs, trusts, and other NHS organizations look for more support in areas with significant IT and service crossover (the use of analytics is the perfect example), organizations like NECS will play a more critical role. NECS benefits from its dual status as both an NHS organization and a commercial supplier. This means it has significant expertise in NHS systems and culture, but operates with significant autonomy and works with a broad cross section of customers. This unique position is critical in ensuring that development of RAIDR takes into account important factors unique to the way the NHS works. RAIDR: "Intelligence as a service" for healthcare planners and managers RAIDR is NECS"s "uber" BI service, and is part of its Business Intelligence portfolio. Across the North East, Cumbria, the North West, Suffolk, and Yorkshire, 41 CCGs and 1500 GP practices use the service, covering around 20% of the country; a population of around 10 million. The main user types © Ovum. 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